Friday, January 30, 2009

Recipe for Famous Gluten-free Scones



Among my friends, family, and co-workers I am famous for my scones. I get frequent requests for the recipe.   People are usually surprised to hear that it's wheat-free and gluten-free, it tastes so much like "regular."  Well here it is!

Don't want to mix everything yourself?  I now have a Scone Mix available in my shop.

The Best Gluten-free Scone Recipe



Heat oven to 425 degrees.
Mix together in a large bowl:

2 cups All-purpose Gluten-free Flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 Tbsp baking powder (make sure it's GF)
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt plus a pinch
1/4 tsp xanthan gum (if it's not included in your GF flour mix)

Cut into pieces and drop in:

6 Tbsp cold unsalted butter

Cut the butter in with a pastry blender or two knives, coating the pieces with flour as you go, until the largest pieces of butter are pea-sized. Keep this mixture cold, chilling it in the refrigerator if the butter starts to soften.

Stir in:

1/2 cup chopped nuts (optional) and/or
1/2 cup dried fruit (optional)

Whisk together in a separate bowl:

3/4 cup cream (substitute unsweetened coconut cream if you are lactose intolerant)
1 egg
1-2 tsp orange or lemon zest (optional)

Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients. Stir until the mixture starts to hold together, then gently knead the dough a few times with your hands. Depending on your flour mix, the dough may be very sticky. While this makes it difficult to handle, it is okay. If the dough seems dry and won't hold together easily, add 1-2 Tbsp more cream and knead it in.

Put the dough on a high-quality baking sheet. Gently push the dough into a flat disk about one inch high. Cut into eight equal pieces and arrange them on the baking sheet about one inch apart. Brush some cream onto the tops of the scones. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of one comes out clean.

Enjoy your gluten-free scones!







79 comments:

Rebecca said...

I can attest to the deliciousness of these scones. Even those of us who eat gluten can appreciate these. The recipe appears very versatile as well, which is always a plus.

Gina said...

Thanks for vouching for me, Rebecca! I had a few comments on them yesterday as people were eating them. More than one person said they wouldn't have known that they weren't made from wheat-based flour.

clklmft said...

I agree they are very good and one wouldn't know they are gluten-free.

Linda said...

Thanks for stopping by my blog. I'm glad to find yours and look forward to reading more.

I'm going to try this scones recipe when I get some cream.

Michael said...

The first time I made these, I used Bob's Red Mill GF baking mix, and it worked really well. Every subsequent time, I've tried different GF mixes and have wound up with an impossibly goopy mix. I mean, it takes "difficult to handle" to an extreme. Any hints?

Thanks!

Alex said...

I made these using Bob's Red Mill GF flour. I'm avoiding sugar so I omitted the sugar and instead added a handful of shredded cheese and some herbs. I substituted fat-free European style yogurt from Trader Joe's for the cream. The results were great. Totally delicious and I was finally able to fulfill my scone/biscuit craving. Thanks!

Dia said...

Today my 'bodaceous babes' Red Hat group was going to a private tea room, & I called a few days ago to see what GF options she had. She said 'we can do that - you'll just have to forgo the scone.
Maybe :) So I did a wee search, & found your blog!
I used my Brown rice mix, (w potatoe starch & tapioca) plus 1/4 C coconut flour, coconut milk for the liquid (I dilute a can with 1/2 C water) & 3 T butter, 3 T coconut oil. I used Apricots, Almonds, lemon zest & a bit of freshly ground nutmeg - delish!

These were a bit sweet for my taste, I'd reduce the sweetening next time (prob use 1 Tbsp Agave nectar) - but lovely for a party scone!
Coconut flour, since it's so high in soluable fiber, requires more moisture - I soaked 1 T flax seeds in ~ 1/4 C water (adds more 'stickyness' too) & added the flax seeds with the nuts, whipped the water with the eggs n coconut milk - made it 'just right'

I've been using coconut oil, milk & flour since late this spring, & so enjoy it.
Dr Mary Newport's blog gives updates on her husband Steven's progress w his Altzheimers - he has learned to read again, & is volunteering at the Hosp. where Mary works. http://coconutketones.blogspot.com/

Colleen, who runs the tea room, was a bit surprised when she brot the dried fruit (her subsitute for the scone :( & saw one on my plate! I explained I'd brot my own, & indulged in her whipped cream/sour cream & champagne jelly (need I say YUM??!!) with the rest of the babes!

Stove top scones were often my 'fall back' bread when my kids were growing up - if we needed something for school lunch, quick, make scones! So what a treat to find your recipe first, & have it turn out so well :)
THANKS!

Jamie said...

I'm recently new to the gluten-free diet and am dying for baked goods! Found this recipe and had to give it a try. I used the Arrowhead Mills Pancake and Baking mix and didn't add Xanthum Gum. Also substituted whole milk for the cream. The dough was sooo extremely gooey there was no hope for shaping or cutting. I dropped it by tablespoonfuls on a greased baking sheet instead. Even after all that, they turned out great! Crusty on the outside with nice flavor. I'll definitely be making again. Thanks for the recipe!

Gina said...

Jamie,

Glad you liked it! Milk is quite a bit wetter than cream. I've never done this recipe with milk - I wonder if you should reduce the quantity of liquid if using milk? Mine are never too gooey to handle. Of course, it could also be the baking mix. I've never used the Arrowhead Mills one but hear it's good. Drop scones are perfectly legit, though!

Deirdre Saoirse Moen said...

I just made some of these with 1/2 hazelnut flour and 1/2 a GF mix I make (3 parts each of chickpea flour, buckwheat flour, rice flour, and potato starch, 1 part tapioca starch). Sadly, I had no cream, so I used the top milk from a bottle of whole cream-top milk.

It spread out to the entire pan, which may be the flour or the milk, but it turned out perfectly tasty. Thanks for the recipe!

Gina said...

Dierdre,

I've had bad luck with chickpea flour, especially making scones. Because of my prejudice against it, I'm wondering if it was the chickpea flour that made the scones spread (this happened to me once). However, you can probably use a little less liquid if you're using milk instead of cream. Milk is wetter than cream, so it might over-moisten the dough, but it shouldn't be enough of a difference to make it spread. Hmmm...

Clare said...

Thank you so much for this recipe! I took it to an event I was going to.. full of Gluten Eaters, each scone disappeared! I made then with Pumpkin Pie Spice. So good!

I'm making them again, this weekend. Fortune Cookie flavored! I have a feeling that this will be a go to recipe for years to come!

Gina said...

Clare, I'm really curious how you make fortune cookie flavored scones. Let me know how they turn out! It sounds great.

Ian said...

Hi Gina,

I used your recipe for the gluten-free scones for my daughter today. I have not done much gluten-free cooking before but these scones were amazing. I used Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Flour and only used a 1/4 teaspoon of Xanthan gum. Worked like a charm. I used cranberries as the dried fruit and some chopped almonds. You would not know they were gluten-free. Excellent. Thanks so much.

Ian

Gina said...

Glad they worked out, Ian!

charliemerlyn said...

I tried the recipe with brown sugar, and the scones were delicious, although quite flat. I've since tried again with white sugar and a dash extra of baking soda, and they've turned out lovely!

I think what really works about this recipe is how moist the scones are. Often the problem with gluten-free baking is dryness, but these scones are good to eat just by themselves.

Gina said...

I haven't tried the scones with brown sugar. I have also noticed that sometimes my recipes turn out better with a pinch more baking soda. I definitely go for moistness in the scones. Even regular wheat scones can sometimes turn out too dry. It's a pet peeve of mine! Thanks for the feedback.

Megan said...

Certain things taste better with different blends of flour, which do you prefer for this recipe? Lately I've been experimenting with using Bette Hagman's 4 bean flour mix.

Gina said...

Megan - I'm not a fan of bean flours in general, but I think they are especially problematic for pastries. I have my own gluten-free flour mix that's kind of complicated. Check out my pancake recipe to get an idea of how I blend flours. I should try my pancake mix for scones sometime and report back.

If you can do dairy, I like Pamela's pancake and baking mix.

Dia said...

These have become a favorite! I have some in the oven now (again, with coconut flour & C milk - the coconut flour needs more moisture anyway)
They were great for my Red Hat event, & non GF friends have been surprised how great they taste!! Thanks again :)

tara daley said...

I made these scones for Xmas brunch after a failed batch of GF muffins. So great! I used Pamela's baking mix instead of my favorite flours because I'm out of sorghum flour (and it was 2 am so I was too lazy to mix my own blend). the batter was a bit sticky, I'm not sure why. but I made cranberry orange drop scones and they turned out great! I'll definitely be playing with this recipe some more.

lee said...

Hi!

I need help!

I've made these scones two times now. The first time, I used coconut milk. They turned out really crumbly. I figured more fat would help them out.

So the second time, I used regular heavy cream. They definitely tasted much better! However, they still came out crumbly. Any suggestions for me?

Christine S. said...

I made "Cherry Chocolate Almond" scones using this recipe. I added 1/2 cup dried cherries, 1/2 cup choc. chips, 1 tsp almond extract, 1 tsp vanilla. Brushed the tops with egg/cream, sprinkled with sugar and sliced almonds. Delish! I used Bob's GF AP flour. I like it in most recipes, I'm still hoping to find a mix I can make myself - hope you will share yours someday! Thanks for the recipe.

Gina said...

Lee, You might need to use a little more xanthan gum with your flour mix. That helps to bind it. Also, you might try a flour mix with a higher starch content, or substitute out 1 Tbsp or so of the flour with potato starch or flour. Let me know if this helps!

Christine - I'm glad it worked for you!

stefanie danhope-smith said...

Gina, which gluten-free flour mix do you like to use for these scones?

Lauren said...

Well, I'm always a little nervous when I bake something for a group that I've never tried before, but these were amazing!! I used the Bob's Red Mill baking flour, which has a little bit of a strong 'bean' taste, but they came out light, and more moist than regular scones. I roughly chopped the raisins before adding them to the dough, which made them blend well in the finished scones. The only thing I might change is that I might make 12 instead of 8. They expanded during cooking, and were enormous...and delicious. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Gina said...

Lauren - That Bob's Red Mill mix expands quite a bit. Other (non-beany) mixes hold their shape and size quite a bit better. I've done 10 scones with this recipe, but I think 12 might give you pretty small scones! I've also done bite-sized scones and cooked them for a few minutes less.

Emily said...

Hi there! Thanks so much for sharing this great recipe.

I tried it out and posted it on my blog.

http://celiacunderground.blogspot.com/2010/03/scones.html

Thanks again!

Lani said...

Hi - just tried your scones and they were delicious - and so easy to make. Thank you for sharing the recipe. My two GF daughters will be thanking you too when they get home tonight!
Lani in Samoa

Anonymous said...

yum! I don't have any premix flours so I used 1/2 cup white rice flour, 1/2 cup brown rice flour, 1/2 cup teff flour, 1/4 cup sweet corn flour, 1 Tbsp tapioca starch and 3 Tbsp potato starch. I upped the soda to 1/2 tsp and the xanthan to 1 tsp. I didn't have cream, so I used sour cream and I brushed the tops with raspberry jam. Instead of adding dried fruit, I added raspberry jam and marmalade, as well as some cardamom and pumpkin pie spice....major YUM!
The kids are sleeping in, but I imagine they will be downstairs shortly because the smell is amazing!!! Superb treat on a lazy Sunday morning :)

Anonymous said...

I am new to gluten free and to making scones. this was my very first attempt. I also used the Arrowmills baking product, and cream, and my dough came out very sticky. It is definately the Arrowmills baking mix. they are in the oven now. Hoping to be pleasantly surprised by my labor of love. Oh, and I added 1 chopped apple into it, too.

Mary said...

I am new to the GF scene, being a diagnosed celiac for about 6 weeks now. I'm lucky enough that my city (Tampa) has lots of GF bakeries, but apparently they all believe that you lose your taste buds when you go GF. I tried this with an even swap of Bisquick's new gluten free mix (dropping all the leavening and salt), and added chocolate chips. I am trying to see if the other 7 will make it to tomorrow morning. They are heavenly!! The dough was a bit dry, with some flour still in the bottom after stirring, but I knew after kneading it would all come together. This was the only GF recipe that included butter that I could find, and I really don't understand how on earth you can claim what you're making is a scone without the butter (after all, you're making a shortbread!). Thanks so much, Gina! I'll have to see what else is around your site!

Anonymous said...

Yummy! Best GF scone mix yet. I used Red Mill biscuits and baking mix and added pumpkin spice and coconut milk. They just came out of the oven and I spread some coconut oil on them. Delish!

donna maui said...

I used the Cooks Illustrated recipe for my last batch of scones and wasn't thrilled with the results. Will definitely try yours next!

My baking mix of choice is Pamela's Pancake and Baking Mix.

alana said...

Thanks for the blog and other recipes. I am new to gluten free baking. I have a bakery and make hundreds of scones a week in over 26 flavors. I confess that I used my own recipe and subbed the regular flour for a mixture of brown rice and tapioca flour and potato starch. I did add xanthum gum. I look forward to reading and making some of these recipes as I expand my gluten free products.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the recipe. When I made these this morning for my wife, it turned out soupy, which forced to supplement the mixture with more flour. Did I make a mistake? I used the correct amount of coconut milk, I think. They're in the oven now, and they smell amazing. Thanks again!!!

Puhinaivi said...

I don't have any xanthum gum, but want to make these right now! Can I do it without? I would just be using Red Mill plus some Mochi Sweet Rice flour....

Gina said...

You can make these without xanthan gum, however, you might want to reduce the amount of liquid in the recipe. I've used Bob's Red Mill GF all-purpose baking mix before, and don't usually recommend it. It has a lot of bean flours in it which I think makes the scones a bit beany for my taste. Good luck and let me know how they come out!

Velodiction said...

Thank you for the recipe. I have been searching for a great breakfast treat for my yoga class...and this one takes the cake...er...scone!

Pam Snow, Innkeeper, Parkside Bed and Breakfast said...

Just came across your site as I was searching for gluten free scones to use for our bed and breakfast. All your recipes look amazing and the comments are very encouraging ;-) I can't wait to try your recipe! Thanks for sharing your experiences and recipes.

Danelle said...

I tried making these for the first time today. I used Jules gluten free four which is a mix so I didn't need the xanthan gum. I followed the recipe exactly and for my add ins I used dried cranberries and chopped dried apricots. These scones are very tasty. I used a dark nonstick pan and mine stuck just a little. Next time I will spray the pan lightly with Pam. Thanks for the great recipe.

theUngourmet said...

I have just recently gone gluten free and was looking for a nice gf scone recipe. Thanks!

It's nice to find another fellow Portland blogger. :)

Kelsey said...

I have another recipes batch in the oven and they don't look so hot. I then googled for more gluten free scone recipes and yours look awesome! Next time. Glad to find your blog.

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for sharing this! I made them with 1/2 cup of chopped crystallized ginger and 1/2 cup of chopped pecans. I used sour cream instead of cream. I added the 1 tsp vanilla extract and 1 tsp almond extract that someone had suggested in the other comments... I brushed the tops with eggwash and sprinkled a bit of sugar in the raw on top. YUM!!!

Anonymous said...

Yuuum. Better than 'regular' gluteny scones! Thank You!!

nfreiling said...

I made these today for a Royal Wedding tea party! So delicious I could not stop eating them. I used Jules Gluten Free flour and it was great. Thank you. Thank you.

Gina said...

I'm glad to know that my scone recipe was useful for the royal wedding! I haven't heard of the Jules GF flour. I'll have to check it out!

Anonymous said...

Fantastic recipe! Thank you for sharing! Ended up making quasi-vegan chocolate chip scones; forgot to add the egg and used coconut cream as it was on hand. The scones came out very light and very delicious. Also used a mix of two different gf flours as that is what was also on hand (I make various gf mixes).

bb

Anonymous said...

I reduced the amount of liquid in my dough (I used almond milk, because I'm allergic to dairy, soy and coconuts), but because I had to use a lot of almond flour and agave nectar, they were still very wet. I added about 2 cups of flour to my (double) batch, but it still was not shapable. I used my scoop and plopped them onto my cookie sheet. They weren't triangles, but they were LOVELY!

Cristy Ellen said...

I was searching for something a little different yesterday when i came across this recipe.

I used Celimix - easy mix- Rice bread mix. And I added in the additional Xanthum Gum I used brown sugar, and i added cheese instead of fruit or nuts.. and I used almond silk.

I love them.... I might had more cheese next time, but I have to say I will remake this recipe!

Gina said...

Cristy - this scone recipe is really versatile. You can make lots of substitutions and still get it to come out if you have a flour mix that works. Thanks for your feedback! I'm glad you liked them.

Nicole said...

I've made these scones several times and they have always been absolutely AMAZING! I made them for a potluck and church and everyone asked for the recipe and commented they were the best scones they'd ever eaten (gluten or not). I use the flour mix that the Gluten Free Girl uses for cookies (found here: http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free-holiday-baking-2010/) and I use coconut oil in place of the butter and coconut milk in place of the cream. THANK YOU!!!

Meredith in Wonderland said...

I appreciate your bean-hate. Bean flours Gross. Me. Out. Metallic and bleeehhhh. The very first muffins I made when I was diagnosed with celiac disease were made with chickpea flour (a friend gave me the recipe, and I generally like her cooking), and while they came out beautifully, I literally couldn't force myself to swallow them. So thanks for being opinionated about that! So many gf bloggers just refuse to say bean flours are gross for some ungodly reason.

Leah said...

Can't wait to try this out. I enjoy using Almond Flour. Any suggestions, or do you think it will work ok?

sweetness & light said...

I recently made scones with 2 parts almond flour to 1 part sorghum flour and they came out fairly well, but I was thinking they would be even better if the batter could be lightened a bit, maybe with some whipped egg whites. Anyone else have ideas about that?

Gina said...

Sweetness - Thanks for trying my recipe! I'm glad it worked out for you. I've been using more almond flour recently, which I hadn't tried when I first posted this. Instead of whipping the egg whites, I'd recommend trying some white rice flour in your blend to lighten it up a bit. The combination of sorghum and almond flour is tasty, but tends to be a bit heavy on its own. I've found that rice flour is a lot lighter.

Tracy said...

my children are coming to visit this afternoon and i thought that a good way to get them here early was to say afternoon tea at 4.30 it worked then one said scones i went into a blind panic thankfully i used the web and came up with this site so scones it is and cornish clotted cream thank you

Tamra said...

Thanks for a great recipe. I've missed scones, in the 16 months I've been gluten free! I added chopped, dried apricots, slivered almonds and white chocolate chips to this recipe and everyone at the brunch I took them to was negotiating to get seconds! Definitely a hit, and as others have said, not just with the GF crowd!

Laura Rich said...

I agree that there is too much liquid in this recipe. If you've never made scones before, check out the classic recipe in the Joy of Cooking first to really understand the process. In this case, making it gluten free is simply changing out the regular flour for a gluten free baking mix or gf flours and xantham gum. If you're using a large egg, reduce the liquid to a 1/2 cup or less and add a little bit at a time while kneading gently with your hands. The kneading can take a few minutes to gradually include all the dry crumbs. If you get impatient and add more liquid to incorporate the dry ingredients more quickly, you'll end up with soup, like some of the commenters mentioned. Since many gluten free flours are starch rather than flour, they take much less liquid than wheat flour recipes. Otherwise a good recipe and very close to the classic scone recipes.

Gina said...

Laura - It's true that if you are using a gluten-free flour mix that is mostly starch, this recipe will have too much liquid. However, I adapted this recipe directly from the Joy of Cooking Recipe that you mentioned. The thing is, when I used to make this same recipe with wheat-based flour, I used the same amount of cream as what you see here. The 1/2 cup of cream teh original recipe called for just made the scones too dry for my taste. The All-Purpose Gluten-free flour that I recommend for the recipe has a lot of whole grains in it and is formulated to absorb as much liquid as a traditional wheat-based AP white flour, so I kept the proportions the same as my original modification of the recipe.

You're right that incorporating the liquid slowly into the dry ingredients would help you regulate the ratio of wet to dry, but you could end up over-working the butter, which would make the texture cake-like instead of flaky. Instead, you should add the wet ingredients, preferably cold, all at once, and then quickly mix it together and knead a few short times. If it's too wet then add more flour, refrigerating the dough if necessary to not melt the butter before mixing it. Then make notes on your changes for the next time you make it.

Thanks for your feedback!

DanieGirl said...

These were SO good. Crumbly so next time more xanthum

Gina said...

Daniegirl - Thanks for the comments! Were you using my flour mix by any chance? It doesn't need as much xanthan gum as other mixes do, so if you were using something else then bumping up the amount of xanthan gum might be a good idea!

J. R. Tomlin said...

If you use milk, as I do often do if I don't have cream on hand, reducing it a little seems to work. I mix my own flour. I like a combination of rice and tapioca flour with a little potato starch. I use a lot of Bob's Red Mill products but can not recommend their GF flour which tastes strongly of beans.

Gina said...

J.R. - I couldn't agree more. I love Bob's Red Mill but the A.P. flour is very beany. Also, cream has a lot more solids in it than milk, so if you sub out milk you should use less. Thanks for the comments!

Kylie said...

I made the recipe with my 6:2:1 Rice flour:Potato Starch:Tapioca Starch blend. I also used coconut oil and almond milk. I did not add all of the liquid leaving about a 1/4 of it in the mixing cup. I also did not cut them in quarters in advance, rather baked the entire dough circle for 25 minutes. I then cut them as soon as removed from the oven and left them to cool Perfection.

Gina said...

Kylie - I haven't tried the technique you mention of putting the scones in all in one cake and cutting it after. It sounds like it really works well! Thanks for the idea!

Anonymous said...

I'm a big scone fan and my husband bakes them for me. I would love to have pumpkin scones. Would you please tell me how much to use in your recipe and will I have to make any adjustments to the recipe?
Thank you for sharing your talents!

Gina said...

I've never made pumpkin scones. You'll have to do some experimenting. I'd say you would need to reduce the liquid a bit if you add pureed pumpkin. I'd add some ginger or cardamom as a spice. Other than that, your guess is as good as mine!

Dobsessed said...

I made these today and thought there were absolutely lovely with a dollop of thick cream and jam. Yum yum!!

Gina Kelley said...

Dobsessed - I'm glad you enjoyed your gluten-free scones! I love them with clotted cream and lemon curd. Thanks for the comment!

DonnaG said...

I just made this recipe using thepurepantry baking mix, So Delicious coconut milk vanilla yogurt, flax egg, dark chocolate chips, and walnuts. Brushed the top with coconut milk and sprinkled sugar. Fantastic! I am gluten, dairy, egg, and corn sensitive. Thanks for your recipe; I will be trying different variations for sure!!

Gina Kelley said...

Donna G - That sounds delicious! Thanks for trying my gf scone recipe. I'm glad you liked it!

Jennifer Wolack said...

Any suggestions on flour combinations for someone allergic to wheat, oat, soy, tree nuts (i.e. almond) and RICE?? These sound great, but my daughter's new diet is so restrictive.

Gina Kelley said...

Jennifer - I recently created a new flour blend that is rice-free, and doesn't contain any of the other ingredients you mention, either. I sell it in my shop as the No. 4 Rustic Boule Bread Mix and the No. 7 Bread Flour. I don't have a recipe formulated for scones for these mixes yet, but the flour blend is great! If you want to create your own, check out my guide for blending non-rice flours for bread: http://glutenfreegourmand.blogspot.com/2013/02/Make-your-own-gluten-free-bread-flour.html

Kelly said...

I never comment on things but these scones are delicious! I have a child with multiple food allergies and I've tried numerous recipes. I used a blend of GF flours, vegan butter sticks and almond milk yogurt and they are delicious! My daughter loves them and they have the look and texture of a scone but yet are moist. All I can say is DELICIOUS! THANK YOU!!!

Gina Kelley said...

Kelly - I am glad you like them! It sounds like you found a great way to make these dairy-free!

Anonymous said...

Great recipe! I used Pamela's baking mix. Also deviated by using less sugar- 1/8 cup, and yogurt for cream. Added candied ginger and pecans. Plus an egg wash on top. Patted the batter into a glass pie plate, in one big mass. Baked for 12 minutes. It puffed up, turned a lovely golden, and tastes rich and delicious. I cut into slices after baking. Thank you!

Gluten Prude said...

I have been making scones with this recipe for years now, and I still love them! They are my favorite. I think they are even better than the scones I used to make with wheat. Thanks for the recipe!

Newks said...

I have used this recipe so many times and it is infinitely adaptable. I have tried them with all sorts of different gluten-free flours, fruits, nuts, cheeses (be careful), with two eggs, yoghurt, no xanthem gum etc., etc. They are absolutely delicious and my gluten-free daughter just loves them--as do all her gluten-glugging friends. So, thanks so much for many years of pleasure--and a few more pounds around the waist!!